(TNS)

Tribune News Service

Newsfeatures Budget for Tuesday, August 13, 2019

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Updated at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC).

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Additional news stories appear on the MCT-NEWS-BJT.

This budget is now available at TribuneNewsService.com, with direct links to stories and art. See details at the end of the budget.

^TOP STORIES<

^Climate change is turning Florida's sea turtles female. How long can these species survive?<

ENV-CLIMATE-SEATURTLES:MI — Two dozen tiny leatherback turtles swam around in small tanks, attached by fishing lines to a system that kept them from hitting walls and hurting themselves. As an open-water species, leatherbacks don't recognize barriers, so they are kept on leashes at Florida Atlantic University's lab at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton.

It was lunchtime and professor Jeannette Wyneken was feeding them. Leatherbacks are picky eaters, feeding mostly on jellyfish.

Wyneken planned to fatten the baby turtles for a few weeks, until they can undergo a laparoscopy to check their otherwise imperceptible gender.

Yet even before any testing is done and the hatchlings are released back into the ocean, the scientist already knows there is a strong chance most of the turtles will be one gender: female.

The sex of sea turtles is determined by the temperature of the sand where the eggs incubate. With climate change turning up the heat in South Florida, producing longer and hotter summers, sea turtle gender balance is being thrown way out of whack.

1550 by Adriana Brasileiro in Miami. MOVED

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^POLITICS<

^'A reckoning': Sanders and Warren supporters see an alliance on the brink<

SANDERS-WARREN-SUPPORTERS:WA — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are Senate colleagues, ideological partners and mutual admirers.

But their tacit alliance in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary is approaching a breaking point as they vie to become the progressive alternative to front-runner Joe Biden.

More than five months out from the Iowa caucuses, liberals are thrilled that two of their own are at the top of the field. But there's an underlying worry among some of their supporters that if both Sanders' and Warren's strength endures, they could clear the path for the more moderate Biden to win the nomination — a scenario similar to how Republicans never united behind a single alternative to Donald Trump in the 2016 primary.

1150 (with trims) by David Catanese in Washington. MOVED

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^How Californians moving to Nevada are changing the state's politics<

NEVADA-POLITICS:SJ — An exodus of Californians has accelerated Nevada's move to the left, helping Democrats take control of state government for the first time in a generation and paving the way for a slate of progressive policies, according to political strategists and observers here.

Now, the hundreds of thousands of former Californians who've moved across state lines could be a boon for Kamala Harris, the senator representing their former home state, in the crucial Nevada Democratic caucuses next year.

1550 (with trims) by Casey Tolan in Las Vegas. MOVED

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^UNITED STATES<

^Forest Service plan would speed up timber projects in national forests<

NATIONALFORESTS:AT — Brenda Smith thought of her father as she stood at the edge of the Sky Valley Overlook, where she brings her dog every evening to watch the sun fall behind the North Georgia mountains.

Her father once worked on a logging crew, during the years when industrial timber companies nearly picked these mountains clean. Smith, 74, said she doesn't ever want to see these woods as he did, as a scarred wasteland, but fears that will happen if the federal government gets its way.

Earlier this year the Trump administration proposed loosening environmental rules to speed up cutting trees in national forests, eliminating long-standing requirements that environmental studies and public feedback be considered first. The U.S. Forest Service says it wants to cut government red tape so it can do more to fight wildfires.

1350 (with trims) by Johnny Edwards in Atlanta. MOVED

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^Q&A: Modern wildfires pose new health risks for firefighters<

MED-FIREFIGHTERS-QA:KHN — As California's wildfire season gets underway in earnest this month, new research underscores the risks that modern wildfires pose to firefighters' long-term health.

Studies long have linked firefighters' on-the-job exposure to chemicals and toxins in urban blazes with an increased risk of cancer. More recently, as urban-style development reaches into once remote stretches of California's mountains and forests, wildfires are decimating not only vast swaths of forest but also whole communities of homes and businesses. That means firefighters are dealing with exposure to the intense heat produced by burning vegetation as well as fuels and carcinogens more common in urban fires. And, wildfire crews typically aren't equipped with the bulky protective gear urban firefighters wear.

1000 by Barbara Feder Ostrov. MOVED

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