(TNS)

Tribune News Service

Entertainment Budget for Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Updated at noon EDT (1600 UTC).

^TOP STORIES<

^After the coronavirus, the race to resume film production goes global<

^MOVIE-CORONAVIRUS-PRODUCTION:LA—<Ever since the coronavirus crisis put entertainment production in a deep freeze, Hollywood has been eager to get the cameras rolling again.

After all, box office revenue has sunk to virtually zero and more than 100,000 entertainment industry workers have lost their jobs.

With stay-at-home orders in place and domestic production at a standstill, filmmakers are starting to see a thaw abroad.

1550 (with trims) by Stacy Perman and Anousha Sakoui. MOVED

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^TV adapted quickly to coronavirus. Does it have the guts to show what comes next?<

^TV-CORONAVIRUS-WHATSNEXT:LA—<We have been telling stories about the Almost End of the World for a long time now: supernatural or scientific, cosmological cage match or nuclear holocaust, zombie apocalypse or the withering of an abused planet, now underway. With a bang, with a whimper. And now here we are, in an unexpected if long-anticipated moment, living out old fictions.

In Saturday matinee terms, the novel coronavirus is the monster that the might of our armies cannot (yet, maybe never) subdue, becoming scarier with most every new thing we learn about it. The streets are, or were, more or less empty. We are hiding out, holding our breath.

But if the quasi-Armageddon we are now enacting, and which has touched many lives with tragedy, is not what film and television have taught us to expect — if it is more boring and irritating and equivocal on the one hand, and sometimes more amusing and playful — it is still unlike anything most Americans have known.

1600 (with trims) by Robert Lloyd. MOVED

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^What will change when concerts and festivals return? Everything<

^MUS-CORONAVIRUS-CONCERTS:SD—<When will live concerts and festivals return?

No one knows for sure.

But the coronavirus pandemic has led to a constantly growing number of spring and summer tours falling through or being rescheduled for fall or next year. Such major festivals as Coachella and Stagecoach, which were both postponed from April to October in Indio, Calif., could be pushed back to 2021.

Venues of all sizes have been shuttered and many music industry members are now unemployed, from band members, talent agents, stage-crew staff and audio engineers to tour bus drivers, box office employees, security guards and backstage caterers.

1950 by George Varga. MOVED

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^'This will happen': Mark Ruffalo moved mountains to make HBO's new Emmy hopeful<

^TV-IKNOW-THISMUCH-RUFFALO:LA—<Before it was even published in the summer of 1998, Hollywood began circling "I Know This Much Is True." Despite its Tolstoy-esque length and often grim subject matter, Wally Lamb's novel about identical twin brothers became a massive bestseller, boosted by what was then the ultimate endorsement: Oprah Winfrey selected it for her book club.

Twentieth Century Fox gobbled up the movie rights for a reported seven-figure sum. Big-name talent including Matt Damon, Jonathan Demme and Jim Sheridan were attached to the project along the way, and numerous screenwriters attempted to tame the 900-plus-page book, which spans from the 1920s to the 1990s and includes a story within a story about the brothers' Sicilian grandfather. But the adaptation languished in development hell.

1650 (with trims) by Meredith Blake. MOVED

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^MOVIES<

^Brian Cox says movie industry must reinvent itself completely after the pandemic<

^MOVIE-CORONAVIRUS-COX:NY—<Actor Brian Cox says the movie business has lost its way in recent years, falling behind TV as the home of the most imaginative entertainment.

The coronavirus pandemic, he hopes, will prompt a revival.

"What I would do is, I would destroy most of the movie theaters now," said Cox, holed up in Hillsdale, N.Y., during the coronavirus lockdown in an interview with the Daily News last week from his wood-paneled kitchen. "A new paradigm has to be created."

600 by Tim Balk. MOVED

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^'Lucky Grandma' review: Taking on the Chinese mob, with a cig and a sneer<

^LUCKYGRANDMA-MOVIE-REVIEW:TB—<An unusual, agreeable heist picture with just enough feeling behind the style to make it stick, "Lucky Grandma" rests almost wholly on the withering glances of Tsai Chin. Throughout co-writer and director Sasie Sealy's feature debut, Chin, now 86, stares down everyone — from adorable grandson to threatening Chinatown gangster with a look that says: Whatever I'm about to say or do, I've earned it. Oftentimes the glowering Chin, cigarette dangling, stares down the camera, i.e., the audience. You wonder if the camera is going to flinch.

600 by Michael Phillips. MOVED

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^MOVIE-FAMREVIEWS:MCT—<This week's family streaming picks

500 by Katie Walsh. MOVED

^TV, DVD, STREAMING<

^Wendy Williams takes hiatus to deal with symptoms of Graves' disease<

^TV-WILLIAMS:NY—<Wendy Williams is taking a break from her eponymous talk show to deal with fatigue and other symptoms of Graves' disease.

"Recently, Wendy has been dealing with symptoms from her Graves' disease which are causing fatigue," a spokesperson posted in a tweet. "In consultation with her doctor and as a precautionary measure, she will be taking some time off as she continues to receive treatment."

200 by Theresa Braine. MOVED

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^Commentary: 'She-Ra' rewrote the script for TV's queer love stories. Here's why it matters<

^VID-SHERA-POWER-COMMENTARY:LA—<In "She-Ra and the Princesses of Power," many of the most powerful warriors in the war over the fate of the universe are magical princesses. They are strong and they are brave, and you believe they're going to win in the end.

One of the things that has been abundantly clear since "She-Ra's" 2018 debut is that the animated DreamWorks/Netflix series, developed for television by executive producer Noelle Stevenson, is set in a world that is completely, casually LGBTQ-inclusive.

1000 by Tracy Brown. MOVED

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^What to stream: Remembering Lynn Shelton and Fred Willard<

^VID-CORONAVIRUS-WHATTOSTREAM:MCT—<The film and TV world was hit hard last weekend. On Saturday, it was announced that beloved comic actor Fred Willard had passed away at the age of 86 from natural causes. Then, almost immediately after that news broke came word that indie filmmaker and prolific TV director Lynn Shelton had died unexpectedly at age 54 from a previously unknown blood disorder.

650 by Katie Walsh. MOVED

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^VID-NEWONDVD:MCT—<New on DVD: 'Invisible Man' puts new twist on old story

300 by Tribune News Service. MOVED

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^VID-DVDRELEASE:MCT—<List of DVD release dates for May 19 and beyond

150. MOVED

^MUSIC<

^Indie outliers Perfume Genius and Moses Sumney explore queer desire on breakthrough albums<

^MUS-PERFUMEGENIUS-MOSESSUMNEY:LA—<OK, everybody else can go home now (as if they weren't there already): Moses Sumney and Mike Hadreas have made the albums of our strange quarantine season — bleak but tender, sprawling yet intricately detailed, as suffused with the need for physical contact as they are alert to its dangers and prohibitions.

Listen to Hadreas, who performs under the name Perfume Genius, in his song "On the Floor," from the new "Set My Heart on Fire Immediately": "How long till this washes away?" he sings in a breathy croon over funky, undulating guitars, "How long till my body is safe?" Or check out Sumney opening his new 20-song opus "Gr " with a little lesson on the etymology of the word "isolation" — turns out it stems from the same root word that gave us "island."

900 by Mikael Wood. MOVED

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