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Tribune News Service

Entertainment Budget for Monday, October 12, 2020

Updated at 4 p.m. EDT (2000 UTC).

Adds SCOTUS-BARRETT-HANDMAIDS:LA, MUS-CAMPAIGN-BIDEN:LA

^TOP STORIES<

^As Election Day nears, Taylor Swift and A-list artists finally rally behind Biden<

^MUS-CAMPAIGN-BIDEN:LA—<Unlike a lot of her peers in the music industry, Diane Warren was a Joe Biden supporter from day one of the 2020 primaries.

"He was always my guy," said the songwriting legend, who first connected with the former vice president after he introduced the song she wrote with Lady Gaga, "Til It Happens to You," at the 2016 Academy Awards, where was nominated for original song in the campus-rape documentary "The Hunting Ground."

"There was something about Joe that was so empathetic, and the total opposite of the other thing that's in the White House right now," she said. "He looked in my eyes when I met him and said 'You don't know what that song means to me,' and he had tears in his eyes. I did too."

It's no surprise that Warren, like the majority of the music business (save for erratic spoiler-candidate Kanye West and MAGA stalwarts Ted Nugent and Kid Rock) was going to support Biden in 2020. But compared with this time in 2016, when superstars like Beyonc , Jay Z, Bon Jovi and Bruce Springsteen threw mega-concerts for Hillary Clinton, activism in the music world was lower-key. COVID-19 wiped out any hopes of playing inspiring live events; the daily assault of the Trump news cycle made it harder to break through with a different message.

1900 by August Brown. MOVED

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^Protesting Amy Coney Barrett's hearing, these 'handmaids' take on new meaning<

^SCOTUS-BARRETT-HANDMAIDS:LA—<Activists dressed in the crimson robes and white bonnets made famous by Hulu's Emmy-winning drama "The Handmaid's Tale" marched on Capitol Hill Sunday to oppose the Senate confirmation hearing of Amy Coney Barrett. The judge would fill late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court.

The Sunday demonstrators wore face coverings as precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic, rather than the gags worn by the show's characters to silence disobedient handmaids — fertile women who are forcibly impregnated during religious ceremonies in the series' fictional, totalitarian Gilead.

450 by Nardine Saad. MOVED

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^Why Disney is betting on spooky short films — sponsored by brands<

^TV-DISNEY-SPONSORED-SHORTS:LA—<A young woman sits on her living room floor in front of a bowl of steaming water and holding a lighted candle. Around her is a plate of M&M cookies she just baked and a box of mementos she is offering in hopes of summoning the ghost of her true love. Instead, she conjures the image of an annoying guy from her childhood.

With its high production value and comic undertones, the short film could easily stand in for a Super Bowl commercial. In fact, the two-minute video created by a Los Angeles-based filmmaker will begin running this week between Halloween-related programs on the Disney-owned cable channels FX and Freeform and will stream on Hulu.

Disney hopes the collaboration — among five commercials sponsored by Mars Wrigley — will bring in more ad dollars at a time when brands are searching for new ways to attract consumers.

950 by Wendy Lee. MOVED

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^Museums sell Picasso and Warhol, embrace diversity to survive<

^ART-MUSEUMS-CHALLENGES:BLO—<The one-two punch of COVID-19 and the racial-justice movement has upended huge swathes of society — work, school and health care. Below the radar, it's also shaking the foundations of another set of U.S. institutions — museums — forcing them to sell prized works and broaden the definition of great art.

For generations, museums lived by a tightly scripted set of rules. They accepted tax-deductible donations and acquired artists seen as great — mostly European and American, mostly white, mostly men. In deference to the sacredness of their task, they were permitted to sell a work only to buy another, not to keep on the lights or pay conservators.

This past April, after museums from San Francisco to Maine shut their doors due to the pandemic, the Association of Art Museum Directors announced that for two years, works could be sold and the proceeds used for "direct care," with each institution defining what that means.

The impact has been profound.

900 by Katya Kazakina. (Moved as a lifestyle story.) MOVED

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^MOVIES<

^Gal Gadot has been tapped to play Cleopatra, and fan reaction is split<

^MOVIE-GADOT-CLEOPATRA:LA—<Gal Gadot's casting as Cleopatra in an upcoming Paramount film has launched a debate about the Egyptian ruler's ancestry and whether the actress is right for the role.

The film, which will be directed by Patty Jenkins from a script by Laeta Kalogridis, was Gadot's idea and is being billed as an epic biographical drama. The news was first revealed by Deadline.

150 by Sonaiya Kelley. MOVED

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^Take a deep dive into early movies of Mexico's Oscar-winning 'Three Amigos'<

^MOVIE-ROUNDUP-MEXICAN-DIRECTORS:MS—<Long before Oscar went nuts for the Three Amigos, they were making fantastic movies.

Plenty has been written about how a trio of pals, all from Mexico, have dominated the Academy Award for best directing, winning five times between 2013 and 2018 (Damien Chazelle sneaked one in that period, for "La La Land"). But it took the awards a while to recognize the greatness of friends who had been making entertaining movies for years.

I'd argue, in fact, that most of the best movies from Alfonso Cuaron, Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu came well before they started winning naked gold statues for "Roma," "The Shape of Water" and "The Revenant," respectively.

1000 by Chris Hewitt. MOVED

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^Review: 'Time,' a wrenching story of love and injustice, is one of 2020's great documentaries<

^TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW:LA—<The opening sequence of "Time," Garrett Bradley's haunting, heartrending documentary, is a nearly six-minute masterpiece in miniature. It's a montage of home-video snippets, shot over several years by Sibil Fox Richardson, who goes by Fox Rich. We first see her aiming the camera at herself and trying to figure out the best angle — the first of many moments in which she'll gently assert her authorship, framing and reframing her own image. She speaks of her husband, Robert Richardson, who's in prison, noting she herself was released about a week earlier. Moving on to a happier subject, she announces she's pregnant with twins, standing up to reveal her gently swollen belly.

1150 by Justin Chang. MOVED

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^Review: Jim Cummings' 'The Wolf of Snow Hollow' takes aim at monsters and men<

^WOLF-SNOW-HOLLOW-MOVIE-REVIEW:LA—<What do we make of the crime thriller-comedy "The Wolf of Snow Hollow," the follow-up to writer-director-star Jim Cummings' fearless 2018 debut, the crime drama-comedy "Thunder Road"? In something of a spiritual sequel, the critical favorite plants himself in a curiously similar role at the center of a much different movie.

Both "Thunder Road's" Jim Arnaud and "Wolf's" John Marshall are twitchy, insecure lawmen, divorcing or divorced from their wives and managing awkward relationships with their daughters, neither of whom are ever all that happy to see Dad. "Stressed out" doesn't begin to describe Cummings' characters.

600 by Kevin Crust. MOVED

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^TV, DVD, STREAMING<

^You'll laugh, you'll cry. New National Geographic TV show goes inside the North Carolina Zoo<

TV-SECRETS-ZOO-NORTH-CAROLINA:RA — The North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro is considered to be the largest natural habitat zoo in the world. It has 2,600 acres with more than 1,800 animals and 52,000 plants in its care.

And now, it also has its own television show.

"Secrets of the Zoo: North Carolina," a new eight-part National Geographic series featuring the zoo's animals, its veterinarian staff and zookeepers will premiere Oct. 31 on Nat Geo WILD.

500 (with trims) by Brooke Cain in Raleigh, N.C. MOVED

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^<

^TV-TINSEL:MCT—<Rich Koz keeping Halloween season spooky as Svengoolie

1700 by Luaine Lee. MOVED

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^MUSIC<

^Jeff Tweedy's new book is 'How to Write One Song,' and is about how much you can learn about yourself in the trying<

^MUS-TWEEDY-QA:TB—<Jeff Tweedy wants you to write a song. Just one.

He wants you to become so focused on writing that one song that you lose yourself in it, you "disappear there isn't anyone else's image of who you are to compete with. In fact, even the image you have of yourself can take a breather."

And maybe, as he writes in his new book, you'll come to understand that doing something is more rewarding than being something. You might even learn something unexpected about yourself.

We spoke with Tweedy, leader of the Chicago band Wilco, about his new book, "How to Write One Song," and his new solo album, "Love Is the King." Both, he said, were conceived during the pandemic, projects he dug into once Wilco's tour dates were canceled.

2050 by Jennifer Day. MOVED

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^Nelly's 'Country Grammar' arriving in deluxe vinyl versions<

^MUS-NELLY-COUNTRYGRAMMAR:SL—<Nelly's "Country Grammar," celebrating its 20th anniversary, will be rereleased in a special vinyl version Nov. 20.

The deluxe, two-album vinyl set will be pressed in both black and translucent blue vinyl. The rerelease features bonus songs "Icey," "Come Over," "Country Grammar (Instrumental)" and "Ride Wit Me (Instrumental)" available on vinyl for the first time.

150 by Kevin C. Johnson. MOVED

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^MUS-ALBUMS:PH—<Album reviews: Public Enemy, Carla Bruni, Chris Smither

800 by Dan DeLuca. MOVED

^TCA VIDEO NETWORK <

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