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Tribune News Service

Entertainment Budget for Wednesday, May 20, 2020

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Updated at noon EDT (1600 UTC).

^TOP STORIES<

^Inside talk TV's weird and difficult year<

^TV-CORONAVIRUS-TALKSHOWS:BLO—<One day in March, Kelly Clarkson headed out to Montana for what was supposed to be a quick trip to her not-quite-finished vacation home. Within a week, with the coronavirus pandemic worsening, nonessential travel throughout much of the U.S. was shut down. Suddenly, Clarkson found herself adrift in an unusual spot for the host of a daily, syndicated talk show: deep in elk country with no internet, far away from a studio audience.

Soon Clarkson was grappling with an unsettling question, one that hung over everyone in her chatty, glad-handing line of show business. What now?

1100 by Kelly Gilblom. MOVED

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^Zoom has turned us all into David Letterman, talking in riddles and tapping on the screen<

^STAGE-ZOOMPLAY:TB—<I spend my days in the basement with my health, a computer, a phone, Stephen Sondheim and, when fortune smiles, a loyal dog.

From time to time, I either initiate, or respond to, invitations to meetings on Zoom, a flawed but deftly branded videoconferencing app that has thrived during this pandemic by following the lead of Hoover, Kleenex and Chapstick and achieving the rare feat of becoming both a generic verb ("I Zoom, she Zooms, we all Zoomed together") and a noun ("We really should do a Zoom some time").

The arrival of Zoom in our lives will be a significant part of the cultural history of this pandemic. It is at once a personal and professional lifeline and an awful substitute for actual human contact.

900 by Chris Jones. MOVED

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^Mary McNamara: Why I'm glad to say goodbye to 'Some Good News'<

^CORONAVIRUS-MCNAMARA-COLUMN:LA—<Let's hear it for John Krasinski, an entertainment first responder who understood a pandemic-isolated world's need for connection and celebrity pixie dust and conjured the program to meet it. He had the connections and the direct-to-camera experience to make a show celebrating "good news" that was punchy and polished — and, just as important, the sense to end it before it became, like banana bread and closet organizing, just another victim of quarantine fatigue.

On eight consecutive Sundays, Krasinski — who gave us "The Office's" Jim Halpert, the most recent iteration of Jack Ryan and a surprisingly good movie about a world destroyed by monsters with excellent hearing — doled out the YouTube show "Some Good News" from his home. What began as a salute to the triumphs, joys and innovations of regular folks, gleaned mostly from social and legacy media, grew to include celebrity drop-ins, big-swing fundraising and some pretty phenomenal stunts.

1500 by Mary McNamara. MOVED

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^Memorial Day TV: Programming that salutes American heroes<

^TV-MEMORIALDAY:SJ—<The three-day Memorial Day weekend is a great time to catch up on all those TV and streaming shows that you've been meaning to check out.

But there's also some television that actually serves as a reminder of what the holiday is about: honoring and mourning the military personnel who died serving our country.

With that in mind, here are a few viewing recommendations.

450 by Chuck Barney. MOVED

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^MOVIES<

^Movie review: "Inheritance" works off an equation that produces mixed results<

^INHERITANCE-MOVIE-REVIEW:MCT—<Perhaps it's poor form to do criticism as math (for example, (movie) + (movie) = (movie)), but the new thriller "Inheritance," directed by Vaughn Stein, written by Matthew Kennedy and starring Lily Collins, just begs for it. The best way to describe the film is with an equation. "Succession"("Parasite" x "I Know What You Did Last Summer"/"Shallow Grave") = "Inheritance." Whether or not the math quite works out, these are the references that burble to the surface while watching Stein's family drama of money and secrets long buried.

550 by Katie Walsh. MOVED

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^ 'Trip to Greece' review: Delphi gets a couple of new oracles named Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon<

^TRIPTOGREECE-MOVIE-REVIEW:TB—<"The Trip to Greece" marks the fourth and probably final excursion together for Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon and director Michael Winterbottom, whose paradoxical road comedies — freewheeling, yet carefully mapped — have given us a decade of ripe laughs with a side of pathos.

Retracing the 10-year journey of Odysseus from Troy to Ithaca in a breezy, Michelin-star-taverna-laden six days, "Trip to Greece" ventures into the land of the ancients in order to assess where Coogan and Brydon have landed in their mid-50s.

600 by Michael Phillips. MOVED

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^Movie review: 'The Painter and the Thief' a startlingly intimate portrait of its two subjects<

^PAINTER-THIEF-MOVIE-REVIEW:MCT—<Norwegian documentarian Benjamin Ree's "The Painter and the Thief" is a film about a bold art world heist, and the strange relationship that develops between the painter and the man convicted of stealing her work. That event sets the stage, but it proves to be a bit of a MacGuffin for what this film unfolds: a story of deeply human connection between two souls that actually see each other, and the healing power wrapped up in that sense of visibility.

It begins like a procedural, with surveillance footage capturing the crime, and courtroom sketches that illustrate the first conversation between Czech painter Barbora Kysilkova and Karl-Bertil Nordland. She's curious about where her paintings are, but she's curious about him too, and asks to draw him. Feeling guilty and indebted to her, Nordland agrees to sit for a portrait.

650 by Katie Walsh. MOVED

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^MOVIE-FAMREVIEWS:MCT—<This week's family streaming picks

500 by Katie Walsh. MOVED

^MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY<

^Commentary: Bring back concerts with rude, inconsiderate people? Please! All is forgiven<

^MUS-CORONAVIRUS-COMMENTARY:SD—<Here are several things I thought I'd never miss about going to concerts.

1. Boozed-up people spilling their drinks on other people, me included.

2. People using their cell hones to take endless selfies and film entire concerts, obliviously blocking the views of others in the process.

3. People loudly gabbing throughout concerts, about various inane topics, despite having paid sizable amounts of money for their tickets.

Now, more than two months into the coronavirus pandemic and life without live music, I'm ready to reconsider.

500 by George Varga. MOVED

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^CPT-SOUNDADVICE:MCT—<Sound Advice: TVs today not known for their outstanding tuners

600 by Don Lindich. MOVED

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^TV, DVD, STREAMING<

^'The Great' invents depraved games for the idle rich. Here are the 6 most monstrous<

^VID-THEGREAT-DEPRAVEDGAMES:LA—<Hulu's "The Great" spends a lot of time imagining how 18th century Russian royalty might have spent their time. Men who don't have to fight in wars wrestle endlessly in the palace, which is really a fancy frat house. Women forgo literacy and philanthropy for gossip and rolling balls across a lawn. And Peter III — the country's reigning degenerate, portrayed by Nicholas Hoult — tests guns in crowded rooms, sleeps with all his friends' wives and tells jokes he forces everyone to laugh at, whether they're funny or not. (Spoiler: They're not.)

All the casual violence, sex and animal abuse is a rude awakening to Catherine II (Elle Fanning), Peter's starry-eyed wife, who soon seeks to dethrone him in a military-backed coup.

1150 by Ashley Lee. MOVED

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^'Batwoman' Ruby Rose exits superhero series after just one season<

^TV-CW-BATWOMAN-ROSE:LA—<"Batwoman" star Ruby Rose has left the show after one season playing its titular vigilante.

The freshman CW superhero series aired its season finale Sunday and had already been renewed for a second season. Warner Bros. has announced that the role will be recast.

"I have made the very difficult decision to not return to 'Batwoman' next season," Rose said in a statement issued Tuesday. "This was not a decision I made lightly as I have the utmost respect for the cast, crew and everyone involved with the show in both Vancouver and in Los Angeles."

400 by Tracy Brown in Los Angeles. (Moved Tuesday.) MOVED

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^VID-NEWONDVD:MCT—<New on DVD: 'Invisible Man' puts new twist on old story

300 by Tribune News Service. MOVED

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^TV-REMOTE-ADV24:CC—< Around the remote: Chuck Barney's TV and streaming picks for May 24-30

550 by Chuck Barney. MOVED

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^VID-REDBOX:MCT—< Redbox's Top 10 DVD rentals

50. MOVED

^TCA VIDEO NETWORK <

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